• Home
  • Science General
  • Civil-Military Dynamics, Democracy, and International by Patrick James, Seung-Whan Choi

Civil-Military Dynamics, Democracy, and International by Patrick James, Seung-Whan Choi

By Patrick James, Seung-Whan Choi

Addressing decision-making over interstate disputes and the democratic peace thesis, Choi and James construct an interactive international coverage decision-making version with a unique emphasis on civil-military family members, conscription, diplomatic channels and media openness. every one is important in explaining judgements over dispute involvement. The temporal scope is extensive whereas the geographic scope is international. the result's subtle research of the explanations of clash and components that could ameliorate it, and a generalizable method of the examine of overseas family. The findings that media openness contributes to peaceable solution of disputes, that the better the impact of the army the much more likely for there to be interstate disputes, that conscription is probably going to have an analogous influence, and that raises in diplomatic interplay correlate with elevated clash are absolute to generate debate.

Show description

Read or Download Civil-Military Dynamics, Democracy, and International Conflict: A New Quest for International Peace (Advances in Foreign Policy Analysis) PDF

Best science (general) books

Additional info for Civil-Military Dynamics, Democracy, and International Conflict: A New Quest for International Peace (Advances in Foreign Policy Analysis)

Sample text

As Small and Singer suggest, considering the generally slow rate of change in the normalized scores, the same score for each of the following years is used. In this chapter, each normalized score is rank-ordered from “1” to “4” by quartile to ameliorate the discrete dispersion between small and large normalized scores as well as to reduce statistical variations in model fitting. 15 We utilize Van Belle’s (2000: 137–148) global press freedom data collection to measure media openness for each state.

Several studies of American foreign policy go as far as to suggest the opposite Four Factors to Consider 27 relationship, that is, civilian hawks and military doves (see Huntington 1957; Janowitz 1960; Betts 1977). Huntington (1957: 70), in a landmark study, The Soldier and the State, argues that “the tendency of the civilian politician is to court popular favor by curbing the arms budget and simultaneously pursuing an adventurous foreign policy. The military man opposed both tendencies. . ” Betts’ (1977) classic work, Soldiers, Statesmen, and Cold War Crises, maintains that military professionals are less likely than civilians to advocate the use of force because (a) they have a better appreciation for how “chancy” it is; and (b) if things go badly, their lives are on the line.

Hence, the more joint memberships in intergovernmental organizations, the more constrained the two states will be from engaging in a dispute and therefore the more peaceful the dyad. , to control for power preponderance), 48 Civil–Military Dynamics (b) whether the members of each dyad are allied, (c) noncontiguous states, (d) geographic distance, and (e) whether each member of the dyad is a minor power. These five variables are expected to decrease the likelihood of MID involvement and generally have obtained statistical significance in previous studies.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.53 of 5 – based on 6 votes